Is the U.S. President Above the Law?

On June 4, President Trump tweeted that the President has the absolute right to issue pardons, even to himself. The President’s claim came close on the heels of the New York Times’s publication of a letter two White House attorneys had sent months earlier to Robert Mueller, the Special Counsel appointed to investigate links between Trump’s election campaign and the Russian government. That letter made a number of assertions, but one stood out. The lawyers argued that the President’s firing of FBI Director James Comey could not constitute obstruction of justice, because the President is the chief law enforcement officer of the nation, and can fire the FBI Director for any reason at all.

These claims are striking, perhaps especially to international observers of U.S. politics. Can it really be the case that the President of the United States is above the law?

One might suppose that the metes and bounds of presidential power had been long since established. In fact, many important questions about what the President can do—and can get away with—lack definitive answers. The Constitution is silent, for instance, on whether the presidential pardon power extends to the President himself, and a court has never considered the issue, because it has never before arisen in a case. In the absence of definitive answers, we are left to reason our way to conclusions using constitutional first principles and the few fixed points laid down by judicial rulings, guided by scholarly commentary and other sources of persuasive authority.

In that last category, the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC), a Justice Department unit that provides authoritative legal guidance to the executive branch, deserves a mention. Over the years, OLC has produced a substantial body of opinions on presidential powers and immunities. None of these are binding outside the executive branch, and while OLC opinions do tend to take positions favorable to the President, it would be a mistake to dismiss them as hackwork. With some notable exceptions, OLC opinions have a reputation for careful analysis and independence, and they do not always give the President what he wants. Of particular relevance today, a 1974 OLC opinion concluded that the President could not constitutionally pardon himself.

It can be difficult to distinguish among the different claims currently circulating about the President’s powers and immunities, but it is important to do so. For the President to be “above the law” could mean several different things. It could stand for the proposition that the President cannot be criminally prosecuted while in office. This claim has its critics, but substantial mainstream support as well. The core of the argument is that subjecting a sitting President to prosecution would impermissibly interfere with his constitutional responsibilities to the nation, as head of the executive branch. This is the position taken by the OLC, in memoranda issued in 1973 and again in 2000.

Presidential immunity to prosecution might seem to fly in the face of rule-of-law values. But it is important to remember that the Constitution provides another mechanism for dealing with a wayward President: impeachment. The House of Representatives initiates impeachment proceedings by bringing charges for “Treason, Bribery, and other high Crimes and Misdemeanors,” triggering a trial in the Senate, with the Chief Justice presiding. If convicted, the President is removed from office, and there is no bar to prosecuting a former President.

A much more aggressive assertion of presidential immunity holds that whatever use the President makes of his executive powers under Article II of the Constitution is ipso facto lawful. Richard Nixon famously claimed something of the sort when, years after his resignation, he told interviewer David Frost that “when the president does it that means that it is not illegal.” This sweeping proposition finds little support in the law and has few takers today.

The President’s lawyers seem to take a somewhat more nuanced view, but figuring out their argument still requires some work. They write:

It remains our position that the President’s actions here, by virtue of his position as the chief law enforcement officer, could neither constitutionally nor legally constitute obstruction because that would amount to him obstructing himself, and that he could, if he wished, terminate the inquiry, or even exercise his power to pardon if he so desired.

Later, they add:

As you know, and as Mr. Comey himself has acknowledged, a President can fire an FBI Director at any time and for any reason. To the extent that such an action has an impact on any investigation pending before the FBI, that impact is simply an effect of the President’s lawful exercise of his constitutional power and cannot constitute obstruction of justice here. No President has ever faced charges of obstruction merely for exercising his constitutional authority.

Legal scholars Josh Blackman and Alan Dershowitz have articulated what is perhaps the best version of this argument. It runs roughly as follows. The President has the authority under Article II of the Constitution to remove the FBI Director, for any reason or no reason at all. While other forms of presidential misbehavior could amount to obstruction of justice—say, accepting bribes, or tampering with witnesses—the removal of an FBI Director, an official presidential act authorized by the Constitution, could not. It is not so much that the President is above the law when removing the FBI Director, as that there is no law to apply, since the President enjoys complete discretion over whether, when, and why to remove the FBI Director.

It seems to me that this argument only works if we understand the President’s at-will removal authority over the FBI Director to be guaranteed by the Constitution. It is true that, by default, Presidents have the power to remove executive branch officers at will, and no statute expressly purports to limit the President’s removal power over the FBI Director. But the Supreme Court long ago rejected the claim that the Constitution requires that the President be allowed to remove at will all officials in his administration. Congress can place restrictions on the President’s removal authority, so long as these do not impermissibly interfere with the President’s constitutional responsibilities. Thirty years ago, the Supreme Court held that Congress may deny the President at-will removal authority over the Independent Counsel, a powerful prosecutor appointed to investigate executive branch wrongdoing pursuant to the (now defunct) Ethics in Government Act. Surely it would be permissible for Congress to provide that the President may not remove the FBI Director in order to corruptly impede an official proceeding. Indeed, this is one way to read the effect of the obstruction of justice statute, as it interacts with the President’s removal power.

Even if we don’t understand the obstruction of justice statute to impose an implied limit on the President’s removal authority, it does not follow that it can’t apply to the President when he fires the FBI Director. Again, by default, the President has the power to remove executive branch officers. Whether or not the obstruction of justice statute alters that default rule, it can still impose an independent, binding obligation on the President. Even if the President can remove the FBI Director at will, there is no reason why the power to do so must imply immunity from an otherwise valid and applicable anti-corruption statute. In other words, it is possible that the President could fire the FBI Director, and he could stay fired—but the President would have broken the law, if the firing was for a corrupt purpose.

Conflicts over the scope of presidential power are a persistent feature of American democracy. In the past, those involved have sometimes managed to negotiate around some of the open questions, avoiding outright confrontation. In 1998, Ken Starr, the Independent Counsel investigating President Clinton, issued a subpoena requiring the President to testify before a grand jury. Legal experts differed on whether the President could be forced to testify before a grand jury. Rather than defy the subpoena on constitutional grounds, the Clinton Administration worked out an alternate arrangement with the Independent Counsel, whereby the President appeared at the White House for four hours to give testimony under oath.

More conflicts between the Trump Administration and the Special Counsel’s Office may be coming. Although the President regards himself as the consummate negotiator, his tweets suggest he is spoiling for a fight. We could see some spectacular clashes between the President and those investigating him in the future, and a lot of new law on the scope of presidential power being made as a result.

Virginia Law: When Insurers Must Disclose Liability Policy Limits

Under current Virginia law, liability policy limits can only be revealed to a plaintiff’s attorney within limited circumstances, unless a lawsuit is filed.

By Matthew E. Bass, attorney at Burnett & Williams P.C., Loudoun, Fairfax, and Northern Virginia

When someone is seriously injured in a car crash, one critical aspect for a Virginia personal injury attorney to investigate is what kind of liability insurance coverage limits will be available to pay on the claim. [i] One may assume that the liable (at-fault) party’s insurance company must simply disclose the available limits of liability insurance upon request from the injured party’s attorney. However, that is not the case under Virginia law.

Thanks to a law passed in 2008, for the last decade or so the law has required that unless a lawsuit is filed, an injured person’s lawyer in Virginia can only discover the available limits of liability insurance once the total of their client’s medical bills and lost wages [ii] meet or exceed $12,500. But why is $12,500 the threshold?

Part of the answer may be that $12,500 is exactly half of the required minimum level of liability insurance in Virginia, which is $25,000 per injured person, up to a maximum of $50,000 per accident. [iii] The thinking behind the 2008 law requiring this disclosure was that plaintiff lawyers needed to know whether underinsured motorist coverage — or UIM coverage — would be implicated, which is likely in cases with minimum levels of liability coverage ($25,000) and at least $12,500 in medical bills and lost wages. And, practically speaking, those cases with medical bills and lost wages of at least $12,500 might resolve more quickly once the injured person’s lawyer finds out they are dealing with minimum policy limits.

In 2018, the law in Virginia was amended to additionally allow for discovery of liability policy limits if the at-fault party was convicted of DUI (or similar offenses) and the injured person’s injuries arose from the same incident resulting in that conviction, without regard for the dollar amount of medical bills and lost wages. The rationale behind this more recent change in the law is that, in certain circumstances, an intoxicated driver who causes an injury may be liable for “punitive damages,” which punish them for their conduct, in addition to being responsible for medical bills, lost wages, and other specified damages permitted under Virginia law. Following the reasoning of the 2008 law regarding $12,500 in medical bills and lost wages, the idea is that UIM coverage may be triggered — or a liability case may resolve more quickly — if the liable party has been convicted of DUI and the injured person’s lawyer knows the available liability policy limits.

In a time of over-crowded dockets, underfunded court systems, and more personal injury cases (and cars, and people) than ever before, it’s easy to argue that expanded disclosure of liability policy limits — with the underlying goal of opening the door to available coverage limits and facilitating settlement prior to litigation — would be a valuable tool for Virginia personal injury plaintiffs’ attorneys. [iv] However, even with the plaintiff-friendly 2018 change to the law regarding discovery of liability policy limits, lawyers for injured persons in Virginia are still limited to just the two circumstances outlined above if they want to find out how much liability insurance is available without filing a lawsuit.

If you or someone you know has been injured by a drunk driver in Virginia, please contact the attorneys at Burnett & Williams at 703-777-1650.

 

Bốn lá tròn xoay đan xen với nhau vươn lên – Kiêm Liên Thái

Tên giống cây: Bốn lá tròn xoay đan xen với nhau vươn lên

Bốn lá tròn xoay đan xen với nhau vươn lên - Kiêm Liên Thái

Bốn lá tròn xoay đan xen với nhau vươn lên – Kiêm Liên Thái

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ Các lá mọc theo tư thế tròn xoay
⊗ Lá đan xen với lá nhìn rất đẹp
⊗ Cách trồng chúng cũng không cần nhiều kĩ năng lăm
⊗ thường cho thu hoạch vào mỗi vụ xuân đến thu về,

Nhiếp ảnh gia: Kiêm Liên Thái

Nhóm tham gia: Lê Hồng Ngọc, Bùi Bảo Khánh, Bùi Hồng Sơn, Nguyễn Minh Khánh, Nguyễn Xuân Vỹ, Vũ Duy Khánh,

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: 14, Tống Duy Tân, Hàng Bông, Hoàn Kiếm, Cần Thơ
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2: 10/50 Ngõ Đào Duy Từ, Hàng Buồm, Đà Nẵng
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3:10/26 Võ Thị Sáu, Phú Hội, Thành phố Huế, Hải Phòng
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: 15/7 Hàng Chiếu, Hàng Buồm, Hoàn Kiếm, Hà Nội
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: Hẻm 96 Trần Phú, Lộc Thọ, Thành phố Nha Trang, TP HCM

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

Nụ hoa nhài tầm xuân mọc lên trên đất – Vuong Hoa Kiều

Tên giống cây: Nụ hoa nhài tầm xuân mọc lên trên đất

Nụ hoa nhài tầm xuân mọc lên trên đất - Vuong Hoa Kiều

Nụ hoa nhài tầm xuân mọc lên trên đất – Vuong Hoa Kiều

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ Thuộc giống tầm xuân lạ chúng chỉ mọc trên đất
⊗ Người ta dễ nhân giống chúng bằng cách cắt cành
⊗ kỹ năng trồng chúng không cần nhiều tác động
⊗ Hướng dẫn cách trồng cực đơn giản
⊗ Nguyên tắc trồng là giữ chúng phát triển tốt

Nhiếp ảnh gia: Vuong Hoa Kiều

Nhóm tham gia: Vũ Lê Phương Huyền, Vũ Đình Hải, Nguyễn Gia Hưng, Nguyễn Văn Thành, Nguyễn Tuấn Hưng, Nguyễn Ngọc Tuấn, Lê Ngọc Quỳnh Hương

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: 121 Hàng Đồng, Hàng Bồ, Bắc Kạn
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2: 148 Ngô Quyền, Vĩnh Ninh, Thành phố Huế, Bạc Liêu
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3: 152, Hoa Lu, Ninh Hải, Hoa Lư, Bắc Ninh
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: 15 Ngõ Huyện, Hàng Trống, Hoàn Kiếm, Bến Tre
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: 152 Tuệ Tĩnh, Lộc Thọ, Thành phố Nha Trang,  Bình Định
⊗ Địa chỉ số 6: 515A Đường Hùng Vương, Hùng Vương, Hồng Bàng, Bình Dương

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

Nụ tiến xanh ngót bắt đầu ra nụ – Vương Hoàng

Tên giống cây: Nụ tiến xanh ngót bắt đầu ra nụ

Nụ tiến xanh ngót bắt đầu ra nụ - Vương Hoàng

Nụ tiến xanh ngót bắt đầu ra nụ – Vương Hoàng

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ Nụ tiến thuộc dòng cây bò trên mặt đất
⊗ Hoa chúng màu vàng xanh
⊗ Chúng thích hợp cho việc trồng và phát triển quanh năm
⊗ kỹ năng trồng không đòi hỏi nhiều
⊗ Hướng dẫn cách trồng

Nhiếp ảnh gia: Vương Hoàng

Nhóm tham gia: Nguyễn Minh Hoàng, Phạm Khánh Huy, Phạm Văn Hưng, Tạ Quang Huy, Tạ Văn Thảo, Vũ Khánh Huyền, Vũ Văn Tuấn

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: 9 Yersin, Phường Cầu Ông Lãnh, Quận 1, Phú Yên
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2: H8-H9, Nguyễn Thị Nghĩa, Phường 2, Thành phố Đà Lạt, Yên Bái
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3: 15269 Nguyễn Đình Chiểu, Phường Hàm Tiến, Thành phố Phan Thiết, Vĩnh Phúc
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: Nhà 14, 572B/4 Đường Trần Hưng Đạo, Phường 1, Quận 5, Vĩnh Long
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: Ngõ 4, Hamlet 4 – Nam Cat Tien, Tuyên Quang
⊗ Địa chỉ số 6:Nhà 3, ĐT356, Xuân Đám, Cát Hải, Trà Vinh

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

Buồng chuối e ấp chờ đón xuân – Vương Thái Minh

Tên giống cây: Buồng chuối e ấp chờ đón xuân

Buồng chuối e ấp chờ đón xuân - Vương Thái Minh

Buồng chuối e ấp chờ đón xuân – Vương Thái Minh

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ Buồng chuối được một lớp lá bao bọc lấy toàn bộ
⊗ Lớp lá này héo đi thì có lớp lá khác bao bọc lại tạo thành một tư thế khá là đẹp
⊗ Đây là sự kế thừa nhiều năm
⊗ kỹ năng chăm sóc này làm cho buồng ra được nhiều quả

Nhiếp ảnh gia: Vương Thái Minh

Nhóm tham gia: Nguyễn Trung Hiếu, Nguyễn Văn Lân, Phạm Ngọc Hoa, Phạm Minh Đức, Nguyễn Hoàng Huy,

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: Khánh Hòa
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2:Kiên Giang
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3: Kon Tum
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: Lai Châu
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: Lâm Đồng
⊗ Địa chỉ số 6: Lạng Sơn

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

Nụ quả thanh nong vừa mới ra – Tông Kiên

Tên giống cây: Nụ quả thanh nong vừa mới ra

Nụ quả thanh nong vừa mới ra - Tông Kiên

Nụ quả thanh nong vừa mới ra – Tông Kiên

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ Nụ quả thanh nong có là những lớp lá xếp trồng lên nhau
⊗ Lá chúng tương đối cứng
⊗ Mỗi lá có một lớp xương khớp với nhau
⊗ trồng chúng tương đối kĩ
⊗ Kỹ thuật trồng đơn giản

Nhiếp ảnh gia: Tông Kiên

Nhóm tham gia: Đỗ Minh Hiếu, Đỗ Văn Bình, Lê Minh Hiếu, Lê Xuân Trường, Nguyễn Minh Hiếu, Nguyễn Văn Hùng

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: Sơn La
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2: Tây Ninh
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3: Thái Bình
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: Thái Nguyên
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: Thanh Hóa
⊗ Địa chỉ số 6: Thừa Thiên Huế

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

Trông móng rồng xanh ở bờ ao

Tên giống cây: Trông móng rồng xanh ở bờ ao

Trông móng rồng xanh ở bờ ao

Trông móng rồng xanh ở bờ ao

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ thuộc loại xương rồng nên chúng không ra lá
⊗ Sức sống của chúng khá tốt
⊗ Ngọn của cây này tựa như móng rồng, rất kiêu hãnh
⊗ Hoa thường nở vào buổi tối
⊗ Đây là cây móng rồng mọc được vài tuần tuổi, tuy nhiên sự phát triển của nó rất tốt

Nhiếp ảnh gia:  Nguyễn Kim Ngân

Nhóm tham gia: Nguyễn Dũng, Hoàng Hải , Hoàng Quốc Huy, Nguyễn Đức , Nguyễn Đức Thắng, Nguyễn Kim Ngân, Nguyễn Quang Huy, Đoàn Minh Nhật, Đoàn Đình Hưởng,

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: Tây Ninh
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2: Thái Bình
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3: Thái Nguyên
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: Thanh Hóa
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: Thừa Thiên Huế
⊗ Địa chỉ số 6: Tiền Giang

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

Những điều may mắn từ cỏ ba lá sau vườn

Tên giống cây: Những điều may mắn từ cỏ ba lá sau vườn

Những điều may mắn từ cỏ ba lá sau vườn

Những điều may mắn từ cỏ ba lá sau vườn

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ Mang lại sự may mắn, giống cỏ ba lá được nhiều thế hệ học sinh ưa thích
⊗ Chúng bò ngang mặt đất
⊗ Khi bò tới đâu sẽ ra dễ tới đó
⊗ Một khóm có rất nhiều ngọn
⊗ Chúng phát triển rất tốt

Nhiếp ảnh gia: Bùi Huy Thái

Nhóm tham gia: Nguyễn Quang Nhiên, Nguyễn Quang Kiên, Đỗ Việt Phú, Đỗ Đức Hòa, Bùi Huy, Thái Sơn, Bùi Huy Thái, Nguyễn Vũ Thái, Nguyễn Văn Bính, Phạm Khánh Toàn, Phạm Đức Chính, Vũ Thị Thu Trang,

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: 296, Khu Phố Phước Tân, Đồng Xoài, Hà Tĩnh
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2: ĐT741, Thuận Lợi, Đồng Phú, Hải Dương
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3: Ấp 4, Xã Tân Lập, Huyện Đồng Phú, Tỉnh Hậu Giang
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: 05 QL14, Tiến Thành, Đồng Xoài, Hòa Bình
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: 92, Phú Riềng Đỏ, Khu Phố Tân Trà,  Hưng Yên
⊗ Địa chỉ số 6: Ấp 2, Chơn Thành, Khánh Hòa

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

Hoa đỗ giàn trổ bông đầu tiên

Tên giống cây: Hoa đỗ giàn trổ bông đầu tiên

Hoa đỗ giàn trổ bông đầu tiên

Hoa đỗ giàn trổ bông đầu tiên

Nội dung truyền tải giống cây:

⊗ là cây cho quả, tuy nhiên hoa của chúng rất đẹp
⊗ Mỗi cây trổ bông thường là thời điểm nhiều người muốn quan sát
⊗ Hương của hoa rất thơm
⊗ Cánh hoa khá to
⊗ Chúng thường chỉ nở ít ngày là tàn

Nhiếp ảnh gia: Vũ Tiến Thương

Nhóm tham gia: Vũ Tiến Thương, Đinh Minh Tuệ, Phạm Thị Thùy Dương, Trần Gia Uy, Nguyễn Thị Mai Ly, Vũ Hoàng Khánh Vy, Hoàng Thị Minh Hằng, Đỗ Hồng Anh, Đỗ Hữu Hồng, Nguyễn Việt Anh, Nguyễn Văn Trường,

Liên hệ chi tiết:

Địa chỉ số 1: Trần Văn Trà, Tân Phú, Đồng Xoài, Bình Định
⊗ Địa chỉ số 2: 725 QL 14, Tân Bình, Đồng Xoài, Bình Dương
⊗ Địa chỉ số 3: 651 Đường tỉnh 741 TT, Tân Phú, Bình Phước
⊗ Địa chỉ số 4: Đường Số 1, Minh Hưng, Chơn Thành, Bình Thuận
⊗ Địa chỉ số 5: Minh Hưng, Chơn Thành, Cà Mau
⊗ Địa chỉ số 6:  Điện Biên Phủ, Lộc Ninh, Cao Bằng
⊗ Địa chỉ số 7: Thị trấn Thanh Bình, Bù Đốp, Đắk Lắk

Cảm ơn mọi người đã quan tâm!

1 2 3